Proverbs 360 to 450

DIANE 360 - 450

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

360. Mateane a a megatla meleele a fenya a a megatla mekhuchoane.

Wild dogs with long tails beat those with short tails.

The great thieves punish the little ones.

361. Mathoaloane.

A foundling.

Filius nullius. (L.)

362. Matlametloana a jeloe ke disedi.

Gleaners have eaten the froggies.

Little by little the wolf eateth up the goose.

363. Matlhafu a koto mafapaang.

Legs and feet move one by one.

Gradu diverso, via una. (L.)

364. Matlhapenyana a baratani a tlhaloganela nageng.

The Lovers little herd part in the field.

 

365. Matlho ga a kgore.

Eyes are never satisfied.

 

366. Matlho ga a lebele gongoe.

Eyes do not see alike.

One may as much miss the mark by aiming too high as too low.

367. Matlhogole oa mabina go choloa.

The coward who dances only when food is being served.

Fervet olla, vivit amicitia. (L.)

368. Matlo go sha mabapa.

Adjoining houses (always) burn (i.e. in case of fire next door).

(A) The rotten apple (or tooth) injures its neighbours.

369. Matlo ke mabipa.

Houses are covers (for a multitude of sins).

 

370. Matshego ga a tlhakaneloe.

There is no partnership in luck.  1 

Actutum fortunae solent mutarier. Varia vita est. (L.)

371. Mebala ea bolaea.

Fine colours (ornaments = the quest for jewels) are injurious.

Perlen bedeuten Thränen. (G.)

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

372. Me ga loare ea bo e tla boleloa ke Moroa, ntla ke eo e boleloa ke mongoa eone, are thamagana!

Did you not say the Bushman will give away the secret?
Here the owner of the cow himself describes it in detail: he says it was red and speckled.

I never whispered a private affair
Within the hearing of cat or mouse,
No, not to myself in the closet alone
But I heard it shouted at once from the top of the house;
Everything came to be known. (Tennyson.)

373. Melamu e mentsi e tlhaletsha dipelo tsa bagale.

Many clubs (weapons) enlighten the hearts of the brave men.

Experience is the best teacher.

374. Meno a mashoeu a bolaea a tshega.

White teeth injure while they are laughing.

(a) 'Tis time to fear when tyrants seem to kiss.
(b) Play, women and wine undo men laughing.

375. Menoana e meleele e direla thateng.

Long fingers go hardly to work.

While the tall maid is stooping the little one has swept the house.

376. Merogoloana ea tsatsing e kgonoa ke go lela e lebagane.

It is best for harts of the summer heat to pant when facing each other (e.g. after hearing the plaintiff, bring him face to face with the defendant).

Hear one side and you will be in the dark; hear both and all will be clear.

377. Metse a lekanye dipota.

The waters are running level with the banks.

 

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

378. Mhuhuco oa phatla oa jeloa, oa kgodugocoane ga o jeloa sepe.

In the sweat of the forehead there is profit; in the sweat of the back of the neck, there is none.

In the seat of thy brow shalt thou eat breat. (X.)

379. Mhula o nale oabo.

(Even) a maidservant has her relatives.

 

380. Mebala ea bolaea.

Fine colours (jewels) are injurious.

Perlen bedeuten Thränen. (G.)

381. Mmapatsi phokoana, o tsamaea a ntshitse.

A dealer, like a he-goat, always goes with his wares exposed.

Hold fast is the first point in hawking.

382. Mmatla-kgoana ga robale.

A searcher after jewels never goes to sleep.

Where care lodges sleep will never lie.

383. Mmopi o jela ka lophegoana.

A potter eats out of a broken dish.

A shoemaker's wife is never well shod.

384. Mmutla o se ka oa ba oa rotha madi.

There must not be a drop of blood from that hare (i.e. not a word of the secret must leak out).

Say you saw it not. (Between you and me and the gate-post).

385. Mo-atla-pedi ga she.

A smith with two hands will never burn.

 

386. Mocoa-kgomo ga se lesilo.

The giver of the ox (= the donor) is not a fool.

He is an ill guest that never drinks to his host.

387. Mocomi o jela segoleng.

The hunter eats while his animal is tied with a thong.

Sure bind, sure find.

388. Modieane mo lese ga e go shoa o ea go booa.

Let her go, she is not going to die, she will come back again.

 

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

389. Modimo ga o je nkabo.

God is not partial.

Actus Dei nemine facit injuriam. (L.)

390. Modimo le one o rata lerito.

God also loves veal.

Death devours lambs as well as sheep (or: Whom the gods love die young, was said of yore).

391. Modikologa o jele pholo ea tona.

 

Hasty resolutions seldom speed well.

392. Mo-ea-kgotla ga lelekoe.

The plaintiff is not to be laughed out of court.

Accedas ad Curium. (L.)

393. Moeng ga dibedi.

A visitor should have no alternatives (= he should do what the homesters are doing).

Follow the customs, or fly the country.

394. Moeng goroga, re je nama.

O visitors, arrive so that we may eat meat.

Friend, whoever you are, welcome.

395. Moeng ngaka, o sidila babobodi.

A visitor's arrival, like a doctor's, has a curative effect upon the sick.

 

396. Moenyana-pele bone loa oabo.

A harbinger is the lamp of his friend.

Happy is he whose friends were born before him.

397. Mogale o galefa shomong.

A brave man is braver in a crowd.

He that walketh with the virtuous is one of them.

398. Mogama sephitshana sa mariga ke ene mo-se-okomedi.

In wintertime (when milk is scarce) only the milkman can look into the pail.

It is an evil cook that cannot lick his own fingers.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

399. Mogami ga bolae phalan ea puleng.

In rainy weather the milkman will never kill a baby phala.

 

400. Mogami o anya morokoco.

The milkman deserves the after milk.

The labourer is worthy of his hire.

401. Mogana motho oa bo a mo rola Modimo.

To refuse a wooer is often to rid him of trouble.

To be ill thought of is sometimes for thy good. (T. a Kempis.)

402. Mogoe oa choene o ja se choene o se jang.

The son-in-law of a monkey eats what a monkey eats.

 

403. Mogoga o mo leele o cosa phiri.

Procrastination will wake the wolf.

The minutes of sloth have often cost long years of bootless sorrow.

404. Moila-kgaka monoa moro.

He dislikes the guinea-fowl, but drinks guinea-fowl broth.

He loathes the spring-head and drinks the foul stream.

405. Moipolai ga leleloe.

It is of no use to weep for a suicide.

(a) He that cuts himself wilfully deserves no salve.
(b) Volenti non fit injuria. (L.)

406. Moga morago kgosi.

He who eats the last is the chief (because hungry eyes are turned to him alone).

(a) The last suitor wins the maid.
(b) I think it was lucky I was born so late.

407. Mokgatha-thite ga se mhodi.

He who breaks a new field is not the reaper.

Les foux font des festins, et les sages les mangent. (F.)

408. Mokopi ga na mafoko.

A suppliant knows no reason.

Ventre affame n'a point d'oreilles. (F.)

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

409. Mo laea kgosi oa bo a e itaela.

He who enjoins the king to be strict often does so against himself.

Nearest the king, nearest the gallows (or Psalm x. 15).

410. Molala ga kgore.

A slave is never satisfied.

A beggar's hand is a bottomless basket.

411. Molala ke eo motonanyana, eo monomagadi Mokoena.

The male servant is a serf, the female servant is your country-woman.

Under the blanket, the black one is as good as the white.

412. Molao ga o gobelele.

The law is not partial.

Actus legis nulli injuriam. (L.)

413. Molao, khutsana e o tsaea shudung.

An orphan can learn the law at his place of service.

 

414. Molato ga o ko oo ja moo-tlhodi.

A crime seldom inflicts its effects upon its originator.

If you steal for others you shall be hanged yourself.

415. Molato o ja ngoana oa one.

A crime eateth its own child.

Debita sequuntur personam debitoris. (L.)

416. Moledi ga reedioe.

The mourner is not listened to.

Weep and you weep alone.

417. Molefa gangoe o lefa ka marapo.

He pays with bones, who pays once.

Bis dat qui cito dat. (L.)

418. Moleleka kgama ea mariga o e leleka a chotse kobo.

He who chases an antelope in winter must do so carrying a cloak.

Forewarned, forearmed.

419. Molelo oa Modimo ga o tingoe.

God's fire can never be quenched.

What God will, no frost can kill.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

420. Molelo oa tladi o tingoa ka o mongoe.

Lightning fire is quenched by other fire.

One fire burns out another's burning.
One pain is lessened by another's anguish.

421. Molelo o fisa ba-o-ori.

The fire burns those who sit by it.

He warms too near that burns.

422. Molelo o o timang o timela go tla tuka; o o kuang o kuela go tla tima.

The fire which is going out goes out to flame again; that which is burning burns to go out again.

Some falls are means the happier to rise.

423. Moloi ga mmala.

A sorcerer has no distinctive colour.

Honest men and knaves may possibly wear the same cloth.

424. Molomo oare o bina o bo o roga o mongoe.

When one mouth is dancing (masticating) it generally agitates the others.

(a) Like dogs, when one barks all bark.
(b) Acridra oxexim excitant embammata.

425. Moncosa bosigo ke mo rata bo sele.

He who wakes me before daybreak I like him after daybreak.

Early starts make easy stages.

426. Mongala; o ngalogile.

 

She hath broken her leg above the knee.

427. Mongoa molao ga o itse.

The law-giver does not know the law.

The law is not the same at morning and night.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

428. Mongoa sengoatha ke eo o?

The possessor of the “lion's share” is he who – ?

He has most in the wedding that lies with the bride.

429. Mongoa thipa ga ke mo lebale, ke lebala mmesi.

I never forget the owner of the knife though I forget the one who roasted the meat.

God sends meat and the devil sends cooks. (I.)

430. Monna ga ipolele, o boleloa ke ba bangoe.

It is not for a man to praise himself; he lets others do it for him.

(a) Brave actions never want a trumpet.
(b) Méfiez-vous d'une femme qui parle de sa vertue. (F.)

431. Monna thekelele theko ea marumo, eare are thee abo a ile; u mo kokorietse.

A man is as slippery as the flank of an army; when he jibs he is gone; so handle him carefully, (mainly used by women).

There is no trust, no faith, no honesty in man; all perjured, all forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers.

432. Mopalami, choene, ga lebale go oa.

A rider like a monkey never forgets that he might fall.

When you ride a colt, see your saddle be girt.

433. Moragana teng oa bana ba mpa ga o tsenoe.

The secret conclaves of the members of a family are not to be meddled with.

Mind your own business.

434. Morama go jeoa o o phunyegileng.

Only the ripe nuts can be eaten.

There is fish for catching, corn for snatching and wood for fetching.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

435. More  2  go alafa o o botlhoko.

The bitter medicine it is that cures.

Desperate diseases need desperate remedies.

436. More oa dintsi ke ntoa.

The best remedy for flies is a war (i.e. as the cattle are driven off there is no milk to attract flies).

 

437. More oa kgakala o ecoa ka motlha oa cholo.

The medicine of a far country is gathered on the day of the game drive.

Kill two birds with one stone.

438. More oa mafoko ke go buioa.

The best remedy for a dispute is to discuss it.

I've had my say out, and I shall be the easier for't all my life (Eliot).

439. More o palangoa ka legotlho.

The tree is climbed by means of a notch.

Venture a small fish to catch a big one.

440. Moroa mmagoe.

The son of his mother.

He is the sone of a bachelor.

441. Moroa mmidibidi oa tlhaga, ngoana a sena gabo-mogolo, a ijela mashori.

The Bushman is a son of the meadow, having no relatives he owes no nephew's duties to any uncle.

He is the best gentleman, the son of his own deserts.

442. Moroa o bonye none, none ea bona Moroa.

The Bushman saw the antelope and the antelope saw the Bushman (i.e. the hunter and the game have descried one another).

Two Sir Positives can scarce meet without a skirmish.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

443. Moroa o hula ka toba.

The Bushman shoots with a blunt arrow.

An archer is not known by his arrows but his aim.

444. Moroa o ja losika.

The Bushman eats (lies on) the sinew. (The cord that spans his bow is made of plaited sinews.)

 

445. Morobela o sa thubegeng ke oa lencoe, oa motho oa thubega.

It is easier to break a human being than to break a stone.

 

446. Moroka o sita ka leru.

The good rain-maker convinces by the sign of a cloud.

A red sky is the shepherd's delight.

447. Mosadi choene o jeoa mabogo.

A woman is like a monkey, you can only eat her hands (labour).

All women are good, viz. for something or nothing.

448. Mosadi ga coe Boroa e se phefo.

A wife never comes from the south, only winds do.

He that goes a great way for a wife is either cheated or means to cheat.

449. Mosadi ga jeoe matlho ese kgomo.

You cannot eat the eyes (pretty face) of a woman; only those of an ox can be eaten.

Fine words don't fill the belly (or rather).
A beautiful woman, hell of the soul.

450. Mosadi mooka o nya le motshegare.

A woman is as useful as a mimosa tree, which yields gum all day long.

One hair of a woman draws more than a team of oxen.

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Proverbs 360 to 450

DIANE 360 - 450

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

360. Mateane a a megatla meleele a fenya a a megatla mekhuchoane.

Wild dogs with long tails beat those with short tails.

The great thieves punish the little ones.

361. Mathoaloane.

A foundling.

Filius nullius. (L.)

362. Matlametloana a jeloe ke disedi.

Gleaners have eaten the froggies.

Little by little the wolf eateth up the goose.

363. Matlhafu a koto mafapaang.

Legs and feet move one by one.

Gradu diverso, via una. (L.)

364. Matlhapenyana a baratani a tlhaloganela nageng.

The Lovers little herd part in the field.

 

365. Matlho ga a kgore.

Eyes are never satisfied.

 

366. Matlho ga a lebele gongoe.

Eyes do not see alike.

One may as much miss the mark by aiming too high as too low.

367. Matlhogole oa mabina go choloa.

The coward who dances only when food is being served.

Fervet olla, vivit amicitia. (L.)

368. Matlo go sha mabapa.

Adjoining houses (always) burn (i.e. in case of fire next door).

(A) The rotten apple (or tooth) injures its neighbours.

369. Matlo ke mabipa.

Houses are covers (for a multitude of sins).

 

370. Matshego ga a tlhakaneloe.

There is no partnership in luck.  1 

Actutum fortunae solent mutarier. Varia vita est. (L.)

371. Mebala ea bolaea.

Fine colours (ornaments = the quest for jewels) are injurious.

Perlen bedeuten Thränen. (G.)

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

372. Me ga loare ea bo e tla boleloa ke Moroa, ntla ke eo e boleloa ke mongoa eone, are thamagana!

Did you not say the Bushman will give away the secret?
Here the owner of the cow himself describes it in detail: he says it was red and speckled.

I never whispered a private affair
Within the hearing of cat or mouse,
No, not to myself in the closet alone
But I heard it shouted at once from the top of the house;
Everything came to be known. (Tennyson.)

373. Melamu e mentsi e tlhaletsha dipelo tsa bagale.

Many clubs (weapons) enlighten the hearts of the brave men.

Experience is the best teacher.

374. Meno a mashoeu a bolaea a tshega.

White teeth injure while they are laughing.

(a) 'Tis time to fear when tyrants seem to kiss.
(b) Play, women and wine undo men laughing.

375. Menoana e meleele e direla thateng.

Long fingers go hardly to work.

While the tall maid is stooping the little one has swept the house.

376. Merogoloana ea tsatsing e kgonoa ke go lela e lebagane.

It is best for harts of the summer heat to pant when facing each other (e.g. after hearing the plaintiff, bring him face to face with the defendant).

Hear one side and you will be in the dark; hear both and all will be clear.

377. Metse a lekanye dipota.

The waters are running level with the banks.

 

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

378. Mhuhuco oa phatla oa jeloa, oa kgodugocoane ga o jeloa sepe.

In the sweat of the forehead there is profit; in the sweat of the back of the neck, there is none.

In the seat of thy brow shalt thou eat breat. (X.)

379. Mhula o nale oabo.

(Even) a maidservant has her relatives.

 

380. Mebala ea bolaea.

Fine colours (jewels) are injurious.

Perlen bedeuten Thränen. (G.)

381. Mmapatsi phokoana, o tsamaea a ntshitse.

A dealer, like a he-goat, always goes with his wares exposed.

Hold fast is the first point in hawking.

382. Mmatla-kgoana ga robale.

A searcher after jewels never goes to sleep.

Where care lodges sleep will never lie.

383. Mmopi o jela ka lophegoana.

A potter eats out of a broken dish.

A shoemaker's wife is never well shod.

384. Mmutla o se ka oa ba oa rotha madi.

There must not be a drop of blood from that hare (i.e. not a word of the secret must leak out).

Say you saw it not. (Between you and me and the gate-post).

385. Mo-atla-pedi ga she.

A smith with two hands will never burn.

 

386. Mocoa-kgomo ga se lesilo.

The giver of the ox (= the donor) is not a fool.

He is an ill guest that never drinks to his host.

387. Mocomi o jela segoleng.

The hunter eats while his animal is tied with a thong.

Sure bind, sure find.

388. Modieane mo lese ga e go shoa o ea go booa.

Let her go, she is not going to die, she will come back again.

 

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

389. Modimo ga o je nkabo.

God is not partial.

Actus Dei nemine facit injuriam. (L.)

390. Modimo le one o rata lerito.

God also loves veal.

Death devours lambs as well as sheep (or: Whom the gods love die young, was said of yore).

391. Modikologa o jele pholo ea tona.

 

Hasty resolutions seldom speed well.

392. Mo-ea-kgotla ga lelekoe.

The plaintiff is not to be laughed out of court.

Accedas ad Curium. (L.)

393. Moeng ga dibedi.

A visitor should have no alternatives (= he should do what the homesters are doing).

Follow the customs, or fly the country.

394. Moeng goroga, re je nama.

O visitors, arrive so that we may eat meat.

Friend, whoever you are, welcome.

395. Moeng ngaka, o sidila babobodi.

A visitor's arrival, like a doctor's, has a curative effect upon the sick.

 

396. Moenyana-pele bone loa oabo.

A harbinger is the lamp of his friend.

Happy is he whose friends were born before him.

397. Mogale o galefa shomong.

A brave man is braver in a crowd.

He that walketh with the virtuous is one of them.

398. Mogama sephitshana sa mariga ke ene mo-se-okomedi.

In wintertime (when milk is scarce) only the milkman can look into the pail.

It is an evil cook that cannot lick his own fingers.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

399. Mogami ga bolae phalan ea puleng.

In rainy weather the milkman will never kill a baby phala.

 

400. Mogami o anya morokoco.

The milkman deserves the after milk.

The labourer is worthy of his hire.

401. Mogana motho oa bo a mo rola Modimo.

To refuse a wooer is often to rid him of trouble.

To be ill thought of is sometimes for thy good. (T. a Kempis.)

402. Mogoe oa choene o ja se choene o se jang.

The son-in-law of a monkey eats what a monkey eats.

 

403. Mogoga o mo leele o cosa phiri.

Procrastination will wake the wolf.

The minutes of sloth have often cost long years of bootless sorrow.

404. Moila-kgaka monoa moro.

He dislikes the guinea-fowl, but drinks guinea-fowl broth.

He loathes the spring-head and drinks the foul stream.

405. Moipolai ga leleloe.

It is of no use to weep for a suicide.

(a) He that cuts himself wilfully deserves no salve.
(b) Volenti non fit injuria. (L.)

406. Moga morago kgosi.

He who eats the last is the chief (because hungry eyes are turned to him alone).

(a) The last suitor wins the maid.
(b) I think it was lucky I was born so late.

407. Mokgatha-thite ga se mhodi.

He who breaks a new field is not the reaper.

Les foux font des festins, et les sages les mangent. (F.)

408. Mokopi ga na mafoko.

A suppliant knows no reason.

Ventre affame n'a point d'oreilles. (F.)

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

409. Mo laea kgosi oa bo a e itaela.

He who enjoins the king to be strict often does so against himself.

Nearest the king, nearest the gallows (or Psalm x. 15).

410. Molala ga kgore.

A slave is never satisfied.

A beggar's hand is a bottomless basket.

411. Molala ke eo motonanyana, eo monomagadi Mokoena.

The male servant is a serf, the female servant is your country-woman.

Under the blanket, the black one is as good as the white.

412. Molao ga o gobelele.

The law is not partial.

Actus legis nulli injuriam. (L.)

413. Molao, khutsana e o tsaea shudung.

An orphan can learn the law at his place of service.

 

414. Molato ga o ko oo ja moo-tlhodi.

A crime seldom inflicts its effects upon its originator.

If you steal for others you shall be hanged yourself.

415. Molato o ja ngoana oa one.

A crime eateth its own child.

Debita sequuntur personam debitoris. (L.)

416. Moledi ga reedioe.

The mourner is not listened to.

Weep and you weep alone.

417. Molefa gangoe o lefa ka marapo.

He pays with bones, who pays once.

Bis dat qui cito dat. (L.)

418. Moleleka kgama ea mariga o e leleka a chotse kobo.

He who chases an antelope in winter must do so carrying a cloak.

Forewarned, forearmed.

419. Molelo oa Modimo ga o tingoe.

God's fire can never be quenched.

What God will, no frost can kill.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

420. Molelo oa tladi o tingoa ka o mongoe.

Lightning fire is quenched by other fire.

One fire burns out another's burning.
One pain is lessened by another's anguish.

421. Molelo o fisa ba-o-ori.

The fire burns those who sit by it.

He warms too near that burns.

422. Molelo o o timang o timela go tla tuka; o o kuang o kuela go tla tima.

The fire which is going out goes out to flame again; that which is burning burns to go out again.

Some falls are means the happier to rise.

423. Moloi ga mmala.

A sorcerer has no distinctive colour.

Honest men and knaves may possibly wear the same cloth.

424. Molomo oare o bina o bo o roga o mongoe.

When one mouth is dancing (masticating) it generally agitates the others.

(a) Like dogs, when one barks all bark.
(b) Acridra oxexim excitant embammata.

425. Moncosa bosigo ke mo rata bo sele.

He who wakes me before daybreak I like him after daybreak.

Early starts make easy stages.

426. Mongala; o ngalogile.

 

She hath broken her leg above the knee.

427. Mongoa molao ga o itse.

The law-giver does not know the law.

The law is not the same at morning and night.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

428. Mongoa sengoatha ke eo o?

The possessor of the “lion's share” is he who – ?

He has most in the wedding that lies with the bride.

429. Mongoa thipa ga ke mo lebale, ke lebala mmesi.

I never forget the owner of the knife though I forget the one who roasted the meat.

God sends meat and the devil sends cooks. (I.)

430. Monna ga ipolele, o boleloa ke ba bangoe.

It is not for a man to praise himself; he lets others do it for him.

(a) Brave actions never want a trumpet.
(b) Méfiez-vous d'une femme qui parle de sa vertue. (F.)

431. Monna thekelele theko ea marumo, eare are thee abo a ile; u mo kokorietse.

A man is as slippery as the flank of an army; when he jibs he is gone; so handle him carefully, (mainly used by women).

There is no trust, no faith, no honesty in man; all perjured, all forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers.

432. Mopalami, choene, ga lebale go oa.

A rider like a monkey never forgets that he might fall.

When you ride a colt, see your saddle be girt.

433. Moragana teng oa bana ba mpa ga o tsenoe.

The secret conclaves of the members of a family are not to be meddled with.

Mind your own business.

434. Morama go jeoa o o phunyegileng.

Only the ripe nuts can be eaten.

There is fish for catching, corn for snatching and wood for fetching.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

435. More  2  go alafa o o botlhoko.

The bitter medicine it is that cures.

Desperate diseases need desperate remedies.

436. More oa dintsi ke ntoa.

The best remedy for flies is a war (i.e. as the cattle are driven off there is no milk to attract flies).

 

437. More oa kgakala o ecoa ka motlha oa cholo.

The medicine of a far country is gathered on the day of the game drive.

Kill two birds with one stone.

438. More oa mafoko ke go buioa.

The best remedy for a dispute is to discuss it.

I've had my say out, and I shall be the easier for't all my life (Eliot).

439. More o palangoa ka legotlho.

The tree is climbed by means of a notch.

Venture a small fish to catch a big one.

440. Moroa mmagoe.

The son of his mother.

He is the sone of a bachelor.

441. Moroa mmidibidi oa tlhaga, ngoana a sena gabo-mogolo, a ijela mashori.

The Bushman is a son of the meadow, having no relatives he owes no nephew's duties to any uncle.

He is the best gentleman, the son of his own deserts.

442. Moroa o bonye none, none ea bona Moroa.

The Bushman saw the antelope and the antelope saw the Bushman (i.e. the hunter and the game have descried one another).

Two Sir Positives can scarce meet without a skirmish.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

443. Moroa o hula ka toba.

The Bushman shoots with a blunt arrow.

An archer is not known by his arrows but his aim.

444. Moroa o ja losika.

The Bushman eats (lies on) the sinew. (The cord that spans his bow is made of plaited sinews.)

 

445. Morobela o sa thubegeng ke oa lencoe, oa motho oa thubega.

It is easier to break a human being than to break a stone.

 

446. Moroka o sita ka leru.

The good rain-maker convinces by the sign of a cloud.

A red sky is the shepherd's delight.

447. Mosadi choene o jeoa mabogo.

A woman is like a monkey, you can only eat her hands (labour).

All women are good, viz. for something or nothing.

448. Mosadi ga coe Boroa e se phefo.

A wife never comes from the south, only winds do.

He that goes a great way for a wife is either cheated or means to cheat.

449. Mosadi ga jeoe matlho ese kgomo.

You cannot eat the eyes (pretty face) of a woman; only those of an ox can be eaten.

Fine words don't fill the belly (or rather).
A beautiful woman, hell of the soul.

450. Mosadi mooka o nya le motshegare.

A woman is as useful as a mimosa tree, which yields gum all day long.

One hair of a woman draws more than a team of oxen.


Footnotes & References

#NoteDescription
1It is not clear whether matshego here stands for "luck" or fore fire-stones — a hearth.
2MoreThe word More (Zulu Muti) means either a Root, a Tree, Medicine, Poison or (as a plural noun) Flora.