Proverbs 451 to 548

DIANE 451 - 548

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

451. Mosadi mosala gae.

O, woman, the stayer at home. (The literal translation of the word Mosadi (woman) is “one-who-remains,” or “she-who-stays.”)

(a) A woman's noblest station is retreat.
(b) A woman should be from her house three times; when she is christened, married and buried.

452. Mosadi o lotlhanya metse.

A woman can set towns a-quarrelling.

Women's jars breed men's wars.

453. Mosadi nca o okoa ka lesapo.

A woman is like a dog which may even be enticed with a bone.

He that will win a Lancashire lass must bait his hook with a good egg-pie.

454. Mosebi o kgoaganya ditsala tse di kgolo.

A back-biter separates great friends.

He that repeateth a matter separateth very friends.

455. Moseki ga itse kgosi.

A plaintiff (suppliant) knows no chief.

Gesetz ist mächtig, aber mächtiger ist die Noth (Goethe).

456. Mosele o ecoe pula e ese e ne.

Dig the trench (drain) before the rain falls.

Have not thy cloak to make when it begins to rain.

457. Mosetsana oa sekoetsere.

Really a buxom lady.

Embonpoint. (F.)

458. Moshoela gagabo ga jeoe o choana le moshoela Matebeleng.

He who dies at home is like him who dies in a foreign country; they cannot be eaten.

One had as good be nibbled to death by ducks, as picked to death by hens.

459. Mosimane oa gae ga na lobelo.

The home courier is never a good runner.

(a) A cow from afar gives plenty of milk.
(b) A prophet is not without honour save in his own country.

460. Mosimane oa kgosing kgosi.

A king's messenger is (as good as) a king.

The servant of a king is a king.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

461. Motho eare are podi dia sisa a bo a raea tsabo.

When a man speaks of goats that give much milk, you may depend upon it he is referring to his own goats.

All his geese are swans.

462. Motho ga itsioe ese naga.

A human being, unlike a country, cannot be thoroughly known.

Les hommes ne se comprennent pas les uns les autres.
Il y a moins de fous qu'on ne croit. (F.)

463. Motho o lebogoa a shule.

A person is always thanked after death.

A prophet hath no honour in his own country.

464. Mothudi ga na thipa.

An ironsmith never has a knife.

A shoemaker's wife is never well shod.

465. 'Motlana ga bege boroku.

A poor man can never find gum (all his finds are claimed by rich men).

A bon chien il ne vient jamais un bon os. (F.)

466. Motlhakana go sha o o itlhatlhatlelang.

The crackling reeds burn faster.

If the hen does not prate, she will not lay.

467. Motlhapisa podi ngoloana gase mo-e-gami.

He who washes a beautiful goat seldom milks it.

The wealth ye find another keeps,
The seed ye sow another reaps,
The robe ye weave another wears,
The arms ye forge another bears.

468. Motlhola tlotlo a se tlo le ja.

Creator of treasures without ever enjoying them (said in praise of hunters' horses).

A good dog never gets a good bone.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

469. Motsamai o ja noga.

A traveller may eat a snake.

Fatigatio humus cubile est. (L.)

470. Motse o loapeng.

The real home is in the courtyard (the women's quarters).

The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world.

471. Do.

Do.

Les hommes font les lois, les femmes font les mœurs. (F.)

472. Motse o senang makoloane logora loa one ga loo.

A city without young men has no outer walls.

 

473. Motshega-kgarebane ke ene moenyadi.

He who laughs at a maiden is the one who will marry her.

Scorn at first makes after-love the more.

474. Motshitshi go gama o motlana, o montsi oa lebatsanya.

A small swarm of bees makes honey; in a big swarm the bees delay each other.

Everybody's business is nobody's business.

475. Mo-utla-kgola ea tlaleng o e lebisa babo.

He who chips off a bone, in time of famine, turns it towards his relatives.

(a) Charity begins at home.
(b) Everyone draws the water to his own mill.

476. Mpebi ea ipelegisa.

The best “carry me” is that which helps itself.

(a) Help yourself, and your friends will bless you.
(b) Aide toi, et le ciel t'aider. (F.)

477. Mpeng ga go boeloe, shuping goa boeloa.

To the womb there is no return; but to the ruins (a deserted home) there may be a return.

The mill will never grind with the water that is past.

478. Mpha-mpha ea lapisa.

“Give-me, Give me” (some food) is too tiresome.

He who depends on another dines ill and sups worse.

479. Mpotloane oa go potla tsa babandoe fela, tsa bo di sa potloe ke ope.

You know how to kill other people's cattle, you butcher, while nobody kilss yours.

I renounce the friend who eats what is mine with me, and what is his own by himself.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

480. Naana ea ngaka ke mpa.

A (witch) doctor's heifer is his stomach – same meaning as Bojang joa pitse.

If a man empties his purse into his head no man can take it from him.

481. Naka tsa podi di choaranye.

The goat's horns are interlocked.

 

482. Nako kgolo e sale eno.

This great time is still the time (= I have been made to wait in vain).

Time tries all.

483. Nama ea nku e tona ga e itukuloe.

The meat of a real healthy wether sheep never needs toothpicking after eating.

True blue will never stain.

484. Nama e beta ka lotha.

The meat chokes by means of a sinew.

The proof of the pudding is in the eating.

485. Nama e monate e ea go fela.

Meat is nicer when it almost eaten.

Drawn wells have sweetest water.

486. Namane eage Kgare e thobile.

Kgare's calf has broken out.

 

487. Namane ga e ke e rutoa letsele.

The calf is not to be taught of the nipple.

A dull ass near home needs no spur.

488. Namane tsa thole, Barolong, tse di jang mogope di o lala.

Barolong are like calves of the same year; they plunder the village in which they sleep (= which they pretend to protect).

See: ba ga Rungoana.

489. Nama-tshitela e thuba pitsana.

The kind of meat that swells in the cooking will burst the pot.

Do not put old wine in new bottles.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

490. Nare tsa Gabene, choana puleng dia raga.

Dark maidens, like the buffaloes of Gabane, kick when it is raining.

See: Choana puleng diaraga.

491. Nca ga eke e loma mongoa eone.

A dog never bites its owner.

Every dog knows its master's footsteps.

492. Nca go fioa e e lelekang.

The hunting dog should always be fed.

A bon chat bon rat. (F.)

493. Ncanyana e bonoa mabotobotong.

A doggie is to be judged by its nosing.

(a) A bird is known by its note, a man by his talk.
(b) Ex auribus cognoscitur asinus. (L.)

494. Ncanyana e sa bogoleng e tseoa ke phiri.

A doggie that never barks will be carried away by the wolf.

Dumb folks get no lands.

495. Nche o tsentse lofetlho.

The ostrich is handling the turn-stick (= things are topsy-turvy).

The Bishop has set his foot in it, i.e. the broth is singed (or: Hurly burly).

496. Ncoe le pelung ga le tshitse.

Feeling when suppressed will never satisfy.

Sorrow concealed is like an oven stopped,
Doth burn the heart to cinders where it is.

497. Ngake eare e tlhocoe go alafe ngakana.

When the clever doctor fails, try one less clever.

If well and them cannot, then ill and them can.

498. Ngaka e dueloa go beng.

A doctor's bill is easier settled where he has some relatives.

He whose father is judge goes safe to the trial.

499. Ngaka e sa shoeng ea eta.

A doctor who does not die goes on a journey.

 

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

500. Ngoaga o sa nthateng feta ke je.

Year that loves me not, pass away so that I may gain.

“Ring out the old, ring in the new” (Tennyson).

501. Ngoana eo bonya le eo o bonako ke ba rata 'mogo.

The slow child and the quick one, I like them both.

Festina lente. (L.)

502. Ngoana eo mogolo o tlhokoa ko o leong.

The eldest (= dutiful) child is missed even where he is.

White son.

503. Ngoana 'ma-ngoane 'nyala, kgomo di boele sakeng.

Marry me, cousin, and retain the dowry cattle in the family fold.

Gleiches Blut, gleiches Glut, und gleich Jahre machen die besten Heirathspaare. (G.)

504. Ngoana 'Ma o anya nyetsana.

An aunt's baby sucks from the childless mother.

Blood is thicker than water.

505. Ngoana oa mosimane o bolaoa ke se o se jang.

The male child is injured by what he gains.

Without pains, no gains (or: Nothing venture nothing win).

506. Ngoana oa ntlha ke eo o bogadi bo duleng pele.

The first child is the one whose mother's dowry was given first.

Haeres legitimus est quem nuptiae demonstrant. (L.)

507. Ngoana oa ntlha molekana oaga rragoe.

The first child is its father's companion.

Like father like son. (A chip of the old block.)

508. Ngoana oare go lelela logodu a lo neoe.

When a child cries after soup, give it to him.

He that will to Cupar, maun to Cupar.

509. Ngoana o jeloe ke pelegi.

Carrying it about too much has finished the child.

The ape kills her young with kindness.

510. Ngoana o sa leleng o shoela tharing.

The child that never cries dies on its mother's back.

Dumb folks get no lands.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

511. Ngoana o sa utloeng molao oa ga rragoe o tla utloa molao oa manong.

The child that heedeth not its father's teaching will obey the law of the vultures.

He that will not be ruled by his own dame shall be ruled by his step-dame.

512. Ngoana 'rago oare go gu abela moretlo u tle u o mo abele.

When your brother gives you wild berries as a gift, offer him a like gift.

(a) With what measure ye mete it shall be measured to you again (Jesus Christ).
(b) Comme il te fais, fais lui. (F.)
(c) Wie du mir, so ich dir. (G.)

513. Ngoedi o epile pico.

The moon has a ring round her (a sign of rain).

Near bur, far rain.

514. Ngoedi o kile a tshega letsatsi are: “U moshoeu.”

The moon once scoffed at the sun and said, “You are white.”

The frying pan said to the kettle: Avaunt black brows.

515. Nka itoma sekgono.

(If that happens) I will bite my elbow (= an impossibility).

Prendre la lune avec les dents. (F.)

516. Nkgasa-kgasa ka pela, dia feta koana tse di tona coora Makaba.

Charm me quickly, before Makabas' beautiful sheep go passing by.

Do, but dally not, that's the widow's phrase.

517. Nkgoedi go lelaloa o chotseng.

Only the hawk that carries something is looked up to.

In times of prosperity, friends will be plenty.
In times of adversity, not one in twenty.

518. Nkgolola e gole [dilo] bothe.

Save me is a slow deliverance; help yourself.

God helps them that help themselves.

519. Nkgonone ga ntshedisa noka e tletse!

My (elder) brother! He helped me across a flooded river.

The river (danger) past, the saint (deliverer) forgotten.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

520. Nkoe go lacoana di mebala.

Spotted leopards lick each other.

Birds of a feather flock together.

521. Nku ga nke di mutlhoa dile pedi, e ngoe e tla go loma.

Never fleece two sheep at a time; the other one may bite you.

Drive not too many ploughs at once.

522. Nna, moroa Segaijane, ke nna ke nna.

I, the son of So-and-so, I am, I am.

Ego sum, ergo omnia sunt. (L.)

523. Noga e itomile mogatla.

The snake has bitten its own tail.

(a) The biter is sometimes bit.
(b) Betrogene Betruger. (G.)

524. Noka e tladioa ke melacoana.

The river is filled by rivulets.

(a) Alle beetjes helpen. (D.)
(b) Klein gewin brengt rykdom in. (D.)

525. Nonyane e nala di ntlha ga e na leshomo.

A bird with sharp claws never gathers a crowed.

Chien hargneux a toujours les oreilles dicherées. (F.)

526. Nonyane tsa “r—r—ru,”” ba tho; eare tlhaka lo shela di rure di ee mo go lole.

People are like birds of the air; when the bulrush burns they usually flee and make for another one.

Put not your trust in mobs. To-day they will hoot and to-morrow adore. To-day they will shout “Hosanna” and to-morrow “Crucify” (Dean Farrar).

527. Nta ea se-lomela-kobong.

(He or she is like) an insect that bites you inside the cloak.

Meddlers are the devils body-lice; they fetch blood from those that feed them.

528. Nta e raletse molelo.

The insect crawled through the embers.

 

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

529. Nthe ga di bajoe dile pedi. Eare o sa sidila lo longoe lo she.

Never scorch two twigs at a time. The one will burn while you are still bending the other.

Two irons in the fire never pay.

530. Ntho e monate e ngoaioa ke mong.

A wound is best when it is scratched by its owner.

I know best where the shoe wrings me.

531. Ntlha ea kgosi e ioa ke Modimo.

God is (ever) on the side of the chief.

God helps the strongest.

532. Ntoa kgolo ke ea molomo.

The greatest war is the war of the mouth (= diplomacy is greater than military operations).

(a) In these days, whether we like it or not, the power is with the tongue.
(b) Qui plume a, guerre a. (F.)

533. Ntsi di okoa ke boladu.

Flies are attracted by matter.

(a) Daub yourself with honey, and you will have plenty of flies.
(b) Partout où il y a de l'argent, il a des juifs. (F.)

534. O bapalela ditloo mo kgetsing e e lechoba.

He gathers his beans into a bag that has a hole.

He waters, ploughs and soweth in the sand.

535. O beeletsa motlhacoa ka tshega.

He found a ripe fruit tree and hung his trousers on it as a sign that he was the finder.

Possession is nine points of the law.

536. O borethe fela jaka tlhapi.

He is as slippery as a fish.

There is as much hold of his words as of a wet eel.

537. O chosa ka meroro.

He scares you only with his roars (= unable to attack).

The noisiest drum has nothing in it but air.

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SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

538. O coa cholo jaga “Ga-rea-di-bona.”

He is returning from the chase of (Mr.) “We'have-n't-found-them.”

He is gone upon a sleeveless errand.

539. O di kapile.

He has caught them (= is drunk).

He hath sown his wild oats.

540. O dinala.

His finger nails are long.

His fingers are lime twigs.

541. O dule ka choba ja mogodu.

He escaped through the hole in the paunch.

He escaped by the skin of his teeth.

542. O fetogile phuti-boloko.

 

His hair grows through his hood.

543. O gu bonetse letsatsi pele.

He has seen the sun before you.

For I was born before you could see.

544. O hura-hura dipabi ka meno.

He is crunching parched-corn with his teeth (when one's teeth are clattering with the cold).

You are saying the ape's paternoster.

545. O itlhatlaganyetsa magala tlhogong.

He is heaping live coals on his head.

Fatua mulier. (L.)

546. O itsetse fela jaka peba.

This child is as complete an image of its parent as a baby mouse is of its mother.

Such a father, such a son.

547. O ka tla a ruta betsi.

She might teach other daughters-in-law (to be rude), so punish her.

 

548. O kalakatlega fela jaka poo ea mariga.

He wanders about just like a bull in winter time.

 

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Proverbs 451 to 548

DIANE 451 - 548

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

451. Mosadi mosala gae.

O, woman, the stayer at home. (The literal translation of the word Mosadi (woman) is “one-who-remains,” or “she-who-stays.”)

(a) A woman's noblest station is retreat.
(b) A woman should be from her house three times; when she is christened, married and buried.

452. Mosadi o lotlhanya metse.

A woman can set towns a-quarrelling.

Women's jars breed men's wars.

453. Mosadi nca o okoa ka lesapo.

A woman is like a dog which may even be enticed with a bone.

He that will win a Lancashire lass must bait his hook with a good egg-pie.

454. Mosebi o kgoaganya ditsala tse di kgolo.

A back-biter separates great friends.

He that repeateth a matter separateth very friends.

455. Moseki ga itse kgosi.

A plaintiff (suppliant) knows no chief.

Gesetz ist mächtig, aber mächtiger ist die Noth (Goethe).

456. Mosele o ecoe pula e ese e ne.

Dig the trench (drain) before the rain falls.

Have not thy cloak to make when it begins to rain.

457. Mosetsana oa sekoetsere.

Really a buxom lady.

Embonpoint. (F.)

458. Moshoela gagabo ga jeoe o choana le moshoela Matebeleng.

He who dies at home is like him who dies in a foreign country; they cannot be eaten.

One had as good be nibbled to death by ducks, as picked to death by hens.

459. Mosimane oa gae ga na lobelo.

The home courier is never a good runner.

(a) A cow from afar gives plenty of milk.
(b) A prophet is not without honour save in his own country.

460. Mosimane oa kgosing kgosi.

A king's messenger is (as good as) a king.

The servant of a king is a king.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

461. Motho eare are podi dia sisa a bo a raea tsabo.

When a man speaks of goats that give much milk, you may depend upon it he is referring to his own goats.

All his geese are swans.

462. Motho ga itsioe ese naga.

A human being, unlike a country, cannot be thoroughly known.

Les hommes ne se comprennent pas les uns les autres.
Il y a moins de fous qu'on ne croit. (F.)

463. Motho o lebogoa a shule.

A person is always thanked after death.

A prophet hath no honour in his own country.

464. Mothudi ga na thipa.

An ironsmith never has a knife.

A shoemaker's wife is never well shod.

465. 'Motlana ga bege boroku.

A poor man can never find gum (all his finds are claimed by rich men).

A bon chien il ne vient jamais un bon os. (F.)

466. Motlhakana go sha o o itlhatlhatlelang.

The crackling reeds burn faster.

If the hen does not prate, she will not lay.

467. Motlhapisa podi ngoloana gase mo-e-gami.

He who washes a beautiful goat seldom milks it.

The wealth ye find another keeps,
The seed ye sow another reaps,
The robe ye weave another wears,
The arms ye forge another bears.

468. Motlhola tlotlo a se tlo le ja.

Creator of treasures without ever enjoying them (said in praise of hunters' horses).

A good dog never gets a good bone.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

469. Motsamai o ja noga.

A traveller may eat a snake.

Fatigatio humus cubile est. (L.)

470. Motse o loapeng.

The real home is in the courtyard (the women's quarters).

The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world.

471. Do.

Do.

Les hommes font les lois, les femmes font les mœurs. (F.)

472. Motse o senang makoloane logora loa one ga loo.

A city without young men has no outer walls.

 

473. Motshega-kgarebane ke ene moenyadi.

He who laughs at a maiden is the one who will marry her.

Scorn at first makes after-love the more.

474. Motshitshi go gama o motlana, o montsi oa lebatsanya.

A small swarm of bees makes honey; in a big swarm the bees delay each other.

Everybody's business is nobody's business.

475. Mo-utla-kgola ea tlaleng o e lebisa babo.

He who chips off a bone, in time of famine, turns it towards his relatives.

(a) Charity begins at home.
(b) Everyone draws the water to his own mill.

476. Mpebi ea ipelegisa.

The best “carry me” is that which helps itself.

(a) Help yourself, and your friends will bless you.
(b) Aide toi, et le ciel t'aider. (F.)

477. Mpeng ga go boeloe, shuping goa boeloa.

To the womb there is no return; but to the ruins (a deserted home) there may be a return.

The mill will never grind with the water that is past.

478. Mpha-mpha ea lapisa.

“Give-me, Give me” (some food) is too tiresome.

He who depends on another dines ill and sups worse.

479. Mpotloane oa go potla tsa babandoe fela, tsa bo di sa potloe ke ope.

You know how to kill other people's cattle, you butcher, while nobody kilss yours.

I renounce the friend who eats what is mine with me, and what is his own by himself.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

480. Naana ea ngaka ke mpa.

A (witch) doctor's heifer is his stomach – same meaning as Bojang joa pitse.

If a man empties his purse into his head no man can take it from him.

481. Naka tsa podi di choaranye.

The goat's horns are interlocked.

 

482. Nako kgolo e sale eno.

This great time is still the time (= I have been made to wait in vain).

Time tries all.

483. Nama ea nku e tona ga e itukuloe.

The meat of a real healthy wether sheep never needs toothpicking after eating.

True blue will never stain.

484. Nama e beta ka lotha.

The meat chokes by means of a sinew.

The proof of the pudding is in the eating.

485. Nama e monate e ea go fela.

Meat is nicer when it almost eaten.

Drawn wells have sweetest water.

486. Namane eage Kgare e thobile.

Kgare's calf has broken out.

 

487. Namane ga e ke e rutoa letsele.

The calf is not to be taught of the nipple.

A dull ass near home needs no spur.

488. Namane tsa thole, Barolong, tse di jang mogope di o lala.

Barolong are like calves of the same year; they plunder the village in which they sleep (= which they pretend to protect).

See: ba ga Rungoana.

489. Nama-tshitela e thuba pitsana.

The kind of meat that swells in the cooking will burst the pot.

Do not put old wine in new bottles.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

490. Nare tsa Gabene, choana puleng dia raga.

Dark maidens, like the buffaloes of Gabane, kick when it is raining.

See: Choana puleng diaraga.

491. Nca ga eke e loma mongoa eone.

A dog never bites its owner.

Every dog knows its master's footsteps.

492. Nca go fioa e e lelekang.

The hunting dog should always be fed.

A bon chat bon rat. (F.)

493. Ncanyana e bonoa mabotobotong.

A doggie is to be judged by its nosing.

(a) A bird is known by its note, a man by his talk.
(b) Ex auribus cognoscitur asinus. (L.)

494. Ncanyana e sa bogoleng e tseoa ke phiri.

A doggie that never barks will be carried away by the wolf.

Dumb folks get no lands.

495. Nche o tsentse lofetlho.

The ostrich is handling the turn-stick (= things are topsy-turvy).

The Bishop has set his foot in it, i.e. the broth is singed (or: Hurly burly).

496. Ncoe le pelung ga le tshitse.

Feeling when suppressed will never satisfy.

Sorrow concealed is like an oven stopped,
Doth burn the heart to cinders where it is.

497. Ngake eare e tlhocoe go alafe ngakana.

When the clever doctor fails, try one less clever.

If well and them cannot, then ill and them can.

498. Ngaka e dueloa go beng.

A doctor's bill is easier settled where he has some relatives.

He whose father is judge goes safe to the trial.

499. Ngaka e sa shoeng ea eta.

A doctor who does not die goes on a journey.

 

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

500. Ngoaga o sa nthateng feta ke je.

Year that loves me not, pass away so that I may gain.

“Ring out the old, ring in the new” (Tennyson).

501. Ngoana eo bonya le eo o bonako ke ba rata 'mogo.

The slow child and the quick one, I like them both.

Festina lente. (L.)

502. Ngoana eo mogolo o tlhokoa ko o leong.

The eldest (= dutiful) child is missed even where he is.

White son.

503. Ngoana 'ma-ngoane 'nyala, kgomo di boele sakeng.

Marry me, cousin, and retain the dowry cattle in the family fold.

Gleiches Blut, gleiches Glut, und gleich Jahre machen die besten Heirathspaare. (G.)

504. Ngoana 'Ma o anya nyetsana.

An aunt's baby sucks from the childless mother.

Blood is thicker than water.

505. Ngoana oa mosimane o bolaoa ke se o se jang.

The male child is injured by what he gains.

Without pains, no gains (or: Nothing venture nothing win).

506. Ngoana oa ntlha ke eo o bogadi bo duleng pele.

The first child is the one whose mother's dowry was given first.

Haeres legitimus est quem nuptiae demonstrant. (L.)

507. Ngoana oa ntlha molekana oaga rragoe.

The first child is its father's companion.

Like father like son. (A chip of the old block.)

508. Ngoana oare go lelela logodu a lo neoe.

When a child cries after soup, give it to him.

He that will to Cupar, maun to Cupar.

509. Ngoana o jeloe ke pelegi.

Carrying it about too much has finished the child.

The ape kills her young with kindness.

510. Ngoana o sa leleng o shoela tharing.

The child that never cries dies on its mother's back.

Dumb folks get no lands.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

511. Ngoana o sa utloeng molao oa ga rragoe o tla utloa molao oa manong.

The child that heedeth not its father's teaching will obey the law of the vultures.

He that will not be ruled by his own dame shall be ruled by his step-dame.

512. Ngoana 'rago oare go gu abela moretlo u tle u o mo abele.

When your brother gives you wild berries as a gift, offer him a like gift.

(a) With what measure ye mete it shall be measured to you again (Jesus Christ).
(b) Comme il te fais, fais lui. (F.)
(c) Wie du mir, so ich dir. (G.)

513. Ngoedi o epile pico.

The moon has a ring round her (a sign of rain).

Near bur, far rain.

514. Ngoedi o kile a tshega letsatsi are: “U moshoeu.”

The moon once scoffed at the sun and said, “You are white.”

The frying pan said to the kettle: Avaunt black brows.

515. Nka itoma sekgono.

(If that happens) I will bite my elbow (= an impossibility).

Prendre la lune avec les dents. (F.)

516. Nkgasa-kgasa ka pela, dia feta koana tse di tona coora Makaba.

Charm me quickly, before Makabas' beautiful sheep go passing by.

Do, but dally not, that's the widow's phrase.

517. Nkgoedi go lelaloa o chotseng.

Only the hawk that carries something is looked up to.

In times of prosperity, friends will be plenty.
In times of adversity, not one in twenty.

518. Nkgolola e gole [dilo] bothe.

Save me is a slow deliverance; help yourself.

God helps them that help themselves.

519. Nkgonone ga ntshedisa noka e tletse!

My (elder) brother! He helped me across a flooded river.

The river (danger) past, the saint (deliverer) forgotten.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

520. Nkoe go lacoana di mebala.

Spotted leopards lick each other.

Birds of a feather flock together.

521. Nku ga nke di mutlhoa dile pedi, e ngoe e tla go loma.

Never fleece two sheep at a time; the other one may bite you.

Drive not too many ploughs at once.

522. Nna, moroa Segaijane, ke nna ke nna.

I, the son of So-and-so, I am, I am.

Ego sum, ergo omnia sunt. (L.)

523. Noga e itomile mogatla.

The snake has bitten its own tail.

(a) The biter is sometimes bit.
(b) Betrogene Betruger. (G.)

524. Noka e tladioa ke melacoana.

The river is filled by rivulets.

(a) Alle beetjes helpen. (D.)
(b) Klein gewin brengt rykdom in. (D.)

525. Nonyane e nala di ntlha ga e na leshomo.

A bird with sharp claws never gathers a crowed.

Chien hargneux a toujours les oreilles dicherées. (F.)

526. Nonyane tsa “r—r—ru,”” ba tho; eare tlhaka lo shela di rure di ee mo go lole.

People are like birds of the air; when the bulrush burns they usually flee and make for another one.

Put not your trust in mobs. To-day they will hoot and to-morrow adore. To-day they will shout “Hosanna” and to-morrow “Crucify” (Dean Farrar).

527. Nta ea se-lomela-kobong.

(He or she is like) an insect that bites you inside the cloak.

Meddlers are the devils body-lice; they fetch blood from those that feed them.

528. Nta e raletse molelo.

The insect crawled through the embers.

 

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

529. Nthe ga di bajoe dile pedi. Eare o sa sidila lo longoe lo she.

Never scorch two twigs at a time. The one will burn while you are still bending the other.

Two irons in the fire never pay.

530. Ntho e monate e ngoaioa ke mong.

A wound is best when it is scratched by its owner.

I know best where the shoe wrings me.

531. Ntlha ea kgosi e ioa ke Modimo.

God is (ever) on the side of the chief.

God helps the strongest.

532. Ntoa kgolo ke ea molomo.

The greatest war is the war of the mouth (= diplomacy is greater than military operations).

(a) In these days, whether we like it or not, the power is with the tongue.
(b) Qui plume a, guerre a. (F.)

533. Ntsi di okoa ke boladu.

Flies are attracted by matter.

(a) Daub yourself with honey, and you will have plenty of flies.
(b) Partout où il y a de l'argent, il a des juifs. (F.)

534. O bapalela ditloo mo kgetsing e e lechoba.

He gathers his beans into a bag that has a hole.

He waters, ploughs and soweth in the sand.

535. O beeletsa motlhacoa ka tshega.

He found a ripe fruit tree and hung his trousers on it as a sign that he was the finder.

Possession is nine points of the law.

536. O borethe fela jaka tlhapi.

He is as slippery as a fish.

There is as much hold of his words as of a wet eel.

537. O chosa ka meroro.

He scares you only with his roars (= unable to attack).

The noisiest drum has nothing in it but air.

SECHUANA PROVERB

LITERAL TRANSLATION

EUROPEAN EQUIVALENT

538. O coa cholo jaga “Ga-rea-di-bona.”

He is returning from the chase of (Mr.) “We'have-n't-found-them.”

He is gone upon a sleeveless errand.

539. O di kapile.

He has caught them (= is drunk).

He hath sown his wild oats.

540. O dinala.

His finger nails are long.

His fingers are lime twigs.

541. O dule ka choba ja mogodu.

He escaped through the hole in the paunch.

He escaped by the skin of his teeth.

542. O fetogile phuti-boloko.

 

His hair grows through his hood.

543. O gu bonetse letsatsi pele.

He has seen the sun before you.

For I was born before you could see.

544. O hura-hura dipabi ka meno.

He is crunching parched-corn with his teeth (when one's teeth are clattering with the cold).

You are saying the ape's paternoster.

545. O itlhatlaganyetsa magala tlhogong.

He is heaping live coals on his head.

Fatua mulier. (L.)

546. O itsetse fela jaka peba.

This child is as complete an image of its parent as a baby mouse is of its mother.

Such a father, such a son.

547. O ka tla a ruta betsi.

She might teach other daughters-in-law (to be rude), so punish her.

 

548. O kalakatlega fela jaka poo ea mariga.

He wanders about just like a bull in winter time.